NFPA 701: Description of Test Methods

20.03.2012 § 2 Comments

(No. 2 of 3) The flammability test we use for all of our drapery fabrics is the ACT performance guideline: NFPA 701. The standard actually includes two tests, one for draperies that weigh less than 21 oz./sq. yd (Test Method #1, the replacement for the original small scale test) and a second for draperies that weigh more than 21 oz./sq. yd or have some kind of backing (Test Method #2, the replacement for the original large scale test). « Read the rest of this entry »

NFPA 701: What is the Small Scale Test?

13.03.2012 § Leave a comment

(No. 1 of 3) When referring to drapery fire tests, we often hear people talk about the “vertical fire test” or “small scale”. The actual test code is NFPA 701. (NFPA stands for National Fire Protection Agency.) Since the test is done vertically, compared with, say, ASTM E-84 which is done with the fabric lying horizontally, NFPA 701 is nicknamed the vertical test.

The latest NFPA 701 version was updated in 2010, although its two test methods have hardly changed since 1996. We use NFPA 701 Test Method #1 for lightweight, single layer draperies. In this test, a hanging fabric is exposed to a 4” flame for 45 seconds; whether it passes depend on how much weight the fabric loses when it burns and whether any pieces that break off continue to burn. This second criterion is sometimes called drip burn. « Read the rest of this entry »

Back to Basics Inspirations

03.02.2012 § 1 Comment

Spring 2012 Back to Basics: Zinnia & Plein AirThe spring 2012 collection developed around a desire to create things that possess a tranquil quality. We are introducing soft textures and subtle patterns, many within our Brentano Green line. There are high performing patterns too like Plein Air and Zinnia (above), but in my mind, the idea of tranquility connects most closely with green mindfulness.

Healthcare Fabrics and Finishes ~ 2

28.12.2011 § Leave a comment

Are stain resistant finishes waterproof?  Are they bleachable?

Because all stain resistant finishes are breathable, any liquid will go through the fabric eventually. It may bead up on the surface at first, but the finish will not make the fabric waterproof.

Similarly, one should not assume that a fabric is chlorine resistant because it has a stain resistant finish. Both GreenShield and Nano-Tex are chlorine resistant, but they will not make a fabric chlorine resistant. The fiber needs to be a chlorine resistant fiber, the way the fiber is dyed needs to be chlorine resistant, and the finish needs to be chlorine resistant. All three – fiber, dye, and finish – have to qualify in order for the fabric to be chlorine resistant. « Read the rest of this entry »

Portfolio Collection 2011 Fall

03.08.2011 § Leave a comment

Pompadour and Parfait in blues

Back in 2010, I had forecast marine as one of the up-and-coming colors for this year, so I reintroduced navy in this fall’s collection. One of our reps had been screaming for jewel tones, so I tried. I still have not had any luck making any new greens, but I will continue to try. « Read the rest of this entry »

Mold, Mildew, and Bacteria

01.07.2011 § 1 Comment

When to use antimicrobial finishes
I’m drawn to performance fabrics because they solve problems for customers.  In hot and humid places, mold and mildew can be a real headache indoors, let alone for outdoor use.  For the interior fabric industry, many fabrics are labeled as “mildew resistant.”  This might not mean that the fabric has been treated with any chemicals, simply that the fiber itself is inherently bacteria-resistant.  « Read the rest of this entry »

Maple and Koi

28.04.2011 § Leave a comment

Remembering “Maple Fall”
Last autumn was long.  Usually Chicago has about two weeks of spring or fall before summer or winter starts.  Last autumn was long enough for the maple leaves to turn brilliantly red.  I planted a few maple trees in my yard years ago but failed; they turn yellow instead of red.   Luckily, there are some beautiful maple trees in my neighborhood to enjoy.  I used to stop and stare at the luminous orange leaves for a long time in the alley on my way home.   « Read the rest of this entry »

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with fabric at Woven-Words.